Type 2 Diabetes

There’s no cure, but you can manage it or prevent it altogether.

JoAnne M. Foody, MD, FACC, CardioSmart Editor-in-Chief
Learn more about Type 2 Diabetes

When you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not use or make insulin the way it should. As a result, the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood becomes too high. Over time, high blood glucose levels can start to damage the blood vessels in the heart, eyes, kidneys, brain, and other parts of your body.

Diabetes and heart disease can go hand in hand. That’s because many of the factors that lead to type 2 diabetes—high blood pressure, being overweight, eating a high-fat diet, smoking and not exercising regularly—also contribute to heart disease and vice versa. If you have diabetes, you are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke than someone who doesn’t have the disease. That’s scary. If you have heart disease, you need to make sure you get your blood glucose checked regularly.

About one in three people with diabetes don’t know they have it. But it can do a number on your body. So, if you think you have diabetes or if it runs in your family, talk with your health care provider.

The good news? There’s plenty you can do to help keep diabetes in check while also slowing or preventing other health problems. You owe it to yourself and your loved ones to learn about diabetes. Use this condition center to learn more about diabetes, create a list of questions to ask your health care provider and get practical tips.

Type 2 Diabetes News & Events

CardioSmart News

Weight Loss Surgery Helps Manage Diabetes

Apr 17, 2014
Weight loss surgery helps obese patients with type 2 diabetes manage their blood sugar levels, according to research.
CardioSmart News

Stumbling Block in Attempt to Reduce Risk of Complications from Surgery

Apr 15, 2014
Aspirin and blood-pressure lowering medication fail to improve outcomes in surgical patients at risk for heart disease.
CardioSmart News

Diabetes Drug Ruled Out as Heart Attack Treatment

Apr 14, 2014
A common diabetes drug, metformin, failed to improve outcomes for non-diabetic patients after a heart attack.

Fighting Diabetes' Deadly Impact on Minorities

Apr 08, 2014
Diabetes is a high priority for the Office of Minority Health because racial and ethnic minorities have a higher burden of the disease.

Secondhand Smoke Causes Permanent Damage to Children's Arteries

Mar 13, 2014
Exposure to secondhand smoke during childhood ages arteries later in life, study finds.

Sudden Death in College Athletes: Cause for Concern?

Feb 27, 2014
Ten-year study finds risk of sudden cardiac death among college athletes is actually lower than in the general population.

Improving America's Health through Active Transportation

Feb 26, 2014
Partners unite to promote active transportation across the country with new platform called “Safe Routes to Everywhere.”

Devices in Public Places Restart Hearts

Feb 21, 2014
Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can help minimally trained bystanders save persons experiencing sudden cardiac arrest.

Safety Concerns About Prescription Weight Loss Pills

Feb 20, 2014
Experts are concerned about the safety of two weight loss pills recently approved for use in the United States.

Yogurt Could Reduce Diabetes Risk

Feb 20, 2014
Low-fat yogurt consumption may reduce risk for type 2 diabetes by 28%, according to recent study.

CVS to Stop Selling Cigarettes; Will Others Follow?

Feb 19, 2014
As CVS vows to eliminate cigarette and tobacco sales over the next year, experts hope other pharmacies will follow their lead to help reduce smoking rates nationwide.

New Smartphone App Estimates Heart Disease Risk

Feb 13, 2014
The American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association have teamed up to launch a new risk app based on the latest guidelines.

Aggressive Treatment Doesn't Prevent Memory Loss in Patients with Diabetes

Feb 11, 2014
Strict blood pressure and cholesterol goals fail to prevent memory loss or decreased brain function in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to study.

Improvements in Heart Patient Safety Among U.S. Hospitals

Feb 07, 2014
Study finds fewer complications among patients hospitalized for heart attack or heart failure between 2005 and 2011.

Anti-Smoking Efforts Saved 8 Million Lives—and Counting

Jan 15, 2014
On the 50th anniversary of the Surgeon General’s first report on smoking and health, study finds tobacco control efforts have increased life expectancy and saved millions of American lives.

Multivitamins Fail to Improve Memory in Older Men

Jan 10, 2014
Study findings suggest that daily multivitamins fail to prevent cognitive decline in older adults.

Exercise Reduces Risk of Cardiac Events in Heart Patients

Jan 10, 2014
High-risk patients who add in about 20 minutes of walking each day can lower their risk for a cardiac event by 10%.

Experts Alarmed by Diabetes Trends

Dec 13, 2013
Global diabetes rates are at an all-time high and expected to increase in coming years.

Energy Drinks Increase the Heart's Contraction Rate

Dec 09, 2013
Study suggests that energy drinks may be unsafe for children and individuals with existing heart conditions, like an irregular heartbeat.

Nut Consumption Linked to Longevity

Nov 26, 2013
Study finds that regular consumption of nuts could lower risk of death by as much as 20%.

Vitamin D Test Misdiagnoses African-Americans

Nov 26, 2013
Standard test wrongly labels most African-Americans as vitamin D deficient.
CardioSmart News

It's Easier to Lose Weight with Family and Friends, Study Finds

Nov 25, 2013
Weight loss interventions in social networks are more effective than standard care.
CardioSmart News

Preschoolers Learn Heart-Healthy Lessons with 'Sesame Street'

Nov 25, 2013
Study finds heart-health messages in “Sesame Street” promote healthier behavior in preschool children.

Registry Programs Improve Quality of Care and Outcomes

Nov 18, 2013
Lessons learned from the American Heart Association’s “Get With The Guidelines” program.

Sudden Cardiac Death Rare in Women

Nov 13, 2013
Study finds that sports-related sudden cardiac death is much lower in women compared to men.

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Diabetes and Heart Disease: Management with a Team Approach

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