Aortic Valve Stenosis

Understanding your health conditions is key to feeling your best.

JoAnne M. Foody, MD, FACC, CardioSmart Editor-in-Chief
Learn more: Aortic Valve Stenosis

The aortic valve is one of four heart valves in the heart. It opens to allow blood to flow into the aorta—the main artery that carries blood out of the heart to your body. If you have aortic valve stenosis, the valve does not open fully. This abnormal narrowing of the valve (stenosis) makes it difficult for blood to flow freely and can weaken the heart. Blood can then back up into your lungs. In severe cases, not enough blood reaches the brain and the rest of your body.

Aortic valve stenosis is not that common, and usually develops later in life. It often results from a build-up of calcium on the valve. You may also develop aortic valve stenosis after having rheumatic fever, a condition that can result from untreated strep throat, or other infections that can damage the valve. Some people are be born with a damaged valve (see congenital heart defects).

If you have aortic valve stenosis, you may not notice anything different at first. Symptoms can take a long while to develop. These may include fainting; chest pain; or feeling short of breath, weak or overly tired, especially with activity. Your doctor may also notice you have a heart murmur.

Treatment will depend on how severe your condition and symptoms are, but may include medications or surgery. You may also be told to avoid competitive sports or other vigorous activities. Use this condition center to learn more about living with aortic valve stenosis. You can also read about the latest research, create a list of questions to ask your doctor and much more.

Aortic Valve Stenosis News & Events

Binge Drinking Harms the Heart

Apr 23, 2013
A study highlights the negative impact that excessive drinking can have on the heart—even in young, healthy individuals.

Save Money with These Prescription Drug Secrets

Apr 16, 2013

Following these tips and shopping around could help you save $100 or more a month depending on the drug.

Witnessing CPR Helps Reassure Family Members, Provides Closure

Apr 15, 2013

Researchers find that family members who observed CPR on their loved ones are significantly less likely to have post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression. 

Despite Lifesaving Benefits, Fewer Women Than Men Get Cardiac Rehab

Mar 09, 2013
Women with coronary artery disease can improve their heart health and reduce their risk of dying from heart disease by attending cardiac rehabilitation.

Do Financial Conflicts of Interest Impact Study Results?

Feb 21, 2013
According to a recent study, funding sources and conflicts of interest have no impact on the outcome of medical studies and trials.

Calcium Supplements May Increase Cardiovascular Risk in Men

Feb 19, 2013
While more research is needed, new findings show how calcium supplements could affect heart health in men.

CardioSmart Partners with Hospitals for National Heart Health Screening Day

Feb 14, 2013
CardioSmart is collaborating with hospitals nationwide to offer free heart health screenings to local residents.

American College of Cardiology Spotlights Heart Health Through Fashion

Feb 05, 2013
Live stream the Red Dress Collection Fashion Show and participate in other events for this national heart health awareness movement.
Spirit of the Heart

Spirit of the Heart—Helping Improve Your Community's Heart Health

Jan 29, 2013

Spirit of the Heart events offer heart disease screening and events in underserved communities.

Resources to Help You Compare Treatment Options

Nov 07, 2012
Guidance from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) in making health decisions
Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement Before Pregnancy

Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement Before Pregnancy

Apr 24, 2012
Surgery and blood thinners may help women with aortic valve disease have safe pregnancy and delivery.

Minimally Invasive Procedure for Replacing Surgical Aortic Valves

Jul 19, 2011

TAV-in-SAV procedure safe and effective in high-risk patients.

Treatment Options for Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis

Apr 05, 2011

Minimally-invasive procedure, TAVI, is promising for patients with severe aortic stenosis.

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