Heart Disease Statistics

General Facts


  • In 2008, over 616,000 people died of heart disease.
  • In 2008, heart disease caused almost 25% of deaths—almost one in every four—in the United States.
  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. More than half of the deaths due to heart disease in 2008 were in men.
  • Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease. In 2008, 405,309 people died from coronary heart disease.
  • Every year about 785,000 Americans have a first coronary attack. Another 470,000 who have already had one or more coronary attacks have another attack.
  • In 2010, coronary heart disease alone was projected to cost the United States $108.9 billion. This total includes the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Women and Heart Disease


  • More than 42 million women are currently living with some form of cardiovascular disease.
  • More than 8 million women have a history of heart attack and/or angina.
  • Five and a half million women will suffer angina.

  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death of American women, killing more than a third of them.
  • 35.3% of deaths in American women over the age of 20, or more than 432,000, are caused by cardiovascular disease each year.
  • More than 200,000 women die each year from heart attacks- five times as many women as breast cancer.
  • More than 159,000 women die each year of congestive heart failure, accounting for 56.3% of all heart failure deaths.

  • 48% of adult women have a total cholesterol of at least 200mg/dL.
  • 50% of Caucasian women, 64% of African-American women, 60% of Hispanic women, and 53% of Asian/Pacific Islander women are sedentary and get no leisure time physical activity.
  • 58% of Caucasian women, 80% of African-American women, and 74% Hispanic-American women are overweight or obese.
  • Women with diabetes are 2.5 times more likely to have heart attacks.

  • More women than men die of heart disease each year.
  • 23% of women and 18% of men will die within one year of a first recognized heart attack; 22-32% of women and 15-27% of men heart attack survivors will die within five years.
  • 12-25% of women and 7-22% of men heart attack survivors will be diagnosed with heart failure within five years.
  • Women are less likely than men to receive appropriate treatment after a heart attack.
  • Women comprise only 27% of participants in all heart-related research studies.

  • Percent of women 18 years and over who met the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity through leisure-time aerobic activity: 44.6%
  • Percent of women 18 years and over who currently smoke: 16.5%
  • Percent of women 18 years and over who had 5 or more drinks in 1 day at least once in the past year: 13.6%

  • Percent of women 20 years and over who are obese: 35.9% (2007-2010)

  • Percent of women 20 years and over with hypertension: 32.8% (2007-2010)

Source: WomenHeart and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Overweight/Obesity


  • Percent of adults age 20 years and over who are obese: 35.9% (2009-2010)
  • Percent of adults age 20 years and over who are overweight (and not obese): 33.3% (2009-2010)
  • Percent of adolescents age 12-19 years who are obese: 18.4% (2009-2010)
  • Percent of children age 6-11 years who are obese: 18.0% (2009-2010)
  • Percent of children age 2-5 years who are obese: 12.1% (2009-2010)

  • In 2008, medical costs associated with obesity were estimated at $147 billion; the medical costs for people who are obese were $1,429 higher than those of normal weight.
  • Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest age-adjusted rates of obesity (49.5%) compared with Mexican Americans (40.4%), all Hispanics (39.1%) and non-Hispanic whites (34.3%)
  • Among non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American men, those with higher incomes are more likely to be obese than those with low income.

  • Higher income women are less likely to be obese than low-income women.
  • There is no significant relationship between obesity and education among men. Among women, however, there is a trend—those with college degrees are less likely to be obese compared with less educated women.
  • Between 1988–1994 and 2007–2008 the prevalence of obesity increased in adults at all income and education levels.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Diabetes


  • Diabetes affects 25.8 million people of all ages (8.3% of the U.S. population)
  • 18.8 million people in the U.S. are diagnosed with diabetes.
  • 7 million people in the U.S. have diabetes but remain undiagnosed.
  • Among U.S. residents ages 65 years and older, 10.9 million, or 26.9 percent, had diabetes in 2010.
  • About 215,000 people younger than 20 years had diabetes—type 1 or type 2—in the United States in 2010.
  • About 1.9 million people ages 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 in the United States.
  • In 2005–2008, based on fasting glucose or hemoglobin A1C (A1C) levels, 35 percent of U.S. adults ages 20 years or older had prediabetes—50 percent of adults ages 65 years or older. Applying this percentage to the entire U.S. population in 2010 yields an estimated 79 million American adults ages 20 years or older with prediabetes.
  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, nontraumatic lower-limb amputations, and new cases of blindness among adults in the United States.
  • Diabetes is a major cause of heart disease and stroke.
  • Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.

Source: National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health.

 

High Blood Pressure


  • About 1 in 3 U.S. adults—an estimated 68 million—has high blood pressure.
  • High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, and kidney disease.
  • High blood pressure was listed as a primary or contributing cause of death for more than 347,000 Americans in 2008.
  • In 2010, high blood pressure was projected to cost the United States $93.5 billion in health care services, medications, and missed days of work.
  • About 1 in 2 U.S. adults with high blood pressure has it under control.
  • Almost 30% of American adults have prehypertension—blood pressure numbers that are higher than normal, but not yet in the high blood pressure range. Prehypertension raises your risk for high blood pressure.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

High Cholesterol


  • Approximately one in every six adults—16.3% of the U.S. adult population—has high total cholesterol.1 The level defined as high total cholesterol is 240 mg/dL and above.
  • People with high total cholesterol have approximately twice the risk of heart disease as people with optimal levels. A desirable level is lower than 200 mg/dL.
  • For adult Americans, the average level is about 200 mg/dL, which is borderline high risk.
  • More women than men have high cholesterol in the United States.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Smoking


  • Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke, and lung diseases (including emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airway obstruction).
  • For every person who dies from a smoking-related disease, 20 more people suffer with at least one serious illness from smoking.
  • Worldwide, tobacco use causes more than 5 million deaths per year, and current trends show that tobacco use will cause more than 8 million deaths annually by 2030.

  • In the United States, tobacco use is responsible for about one in five deaths annually (i.e., about 443,000 deaths per year, and an estimated 49,000 of these smoking-related deaths are the result of secondhand smoke exposure).
  • On average, smokers die 13 to 14 years earlier than nonsmokers.

Percentage of U.S. adults who were current smokers in 2010:9

  • 19.3% of all adults (45.3 million people)
  • 31.4% non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native
  • 25.9% non-Hispanic multiple race
  • 21.0% non-Hispanic white
  • 20.6% non-Hispanic black
  • 12.5% Hispanic
  • 9.2% non-Hispanic Asian

Thousands of young people begin smoking every day.

  • Each day, more than 3,800 persons younger than 18 years of age smoke their first cigarette.
  • Each day, about 1,000 persons younger than 18 years of age begin smoking on a daily basis.

Many adult smokers want to quit smoking.

  • Approximately 69% of smokers want to quit completely.
  • Approximately 52% of smokers attempted to quit in 2010.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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