News & Events

Added to My Toolbox
Removed from My Toolbox
Added to My Toolbox
Removed from My Toolbox
Jun 24, 2014

Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women Encouraged to Increase Seafood Consumption

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency recently updated guidelines regarding seafood consumption for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

Since warning pregnant women about the high levels of mercury in fish in 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Environmental Protection Agency recently updated advice regarding seafood consumption for pregnant and breastfeeding women. These guidelines were based on a review of more than 110 seafood nutrition studies and encourage pregnant and breastfeeding women to consume fish 2-3 times a week for optimal growth and development.

Proposed recommendations include:

1. Eat 8-12 ounces of a variety of fish a week. That’s two or three servings of fish a week. For young children, give them two or three servings of fish a week with the portion right for the child’s age and calorie needs.

2. Choose fish lower in mercury.

  • Many of the most commonly eaten fish are lower in mercury.
  • These include salmon, shrimp, pollock, tuna (light canned), tilapia, catfish, and cod.

3. Avoid 4 types of fish: tilefish from the Gulf of Mexico, shark, swordfish, and king mackerel.

  • These four types of fish are highest in mercury.
  • Limit white (albacore) tuna to 6 ounces a week.

4. When eating fish you or others have caught from streams, rivers, and lakes, pay attention to fish advisories on those waterbodies.

  • If advice isn’t available, adults should limit such fish to 6 ounces a week and young children to 1 to 3 ounces a week and not eat other fish that week.

5. When adding more fish to your diet, be sure to stay within your calorie needs.

For more, read the complete recommendations from the FDA and EPA regarding pregnant women and seafood consumption.

Related

Coca-Cola Family Track Walk in Richmond, VA

A fellow of the American College of Cardiology will be at Richmond International Raceway on Sept. 6 to share tips on heart health and the benefits of an active lifestyle.

Spirit of the Heart in South Bronx, NY

Spirit of the Heart events offer heart disease screening and events in underserved communities.

Short Runs May Help Adults Live Longer, Healthier Lives

According to a recent study, running just 5-10 minutes a day could have significant health benefits.

Folic Acid Deficiency Rare in U.S.

Study finds folic acid deficiency is extremely rare, making routine tests unnecessary in the general population.

Heart Group Says E-Cigarettes Require Strict Regulation

Electronic cigarettes should be included in smoke-free air laws, according to the American Heart Association.

Eat Better

healthy eating

Healthy eating is an important part of healthy living. Learn more »