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Sep 27, 2013

A Healthy Heart in Your Golden Years

CardioSmart Editor-in-Chief JoAnne Foody writes about a few key steps that we should all take to boost heart health.

Having a healthy, active lifestyle is important at any age, but as we get older, simple choices like what we eat and how active we are have an enormous impact on our health. As CardioSmart Editor-in-Chief JoAnne Foody, MD, FACC writes in USA Today’s “The Golden Years” supplement, distributed to millions of readers last weekend, there are a few key steps that we should all take to boost heart health. From cutting back on fat and salt intake to incorporating muscle strengthening activities into our exercise regimen, these simple lifestyle changes can add years to our lives by preventing heart disease and other chronic conditions. And for the millions of Americans already living with heart diseasediabetes and other health conditions, improving diet and increasing physical activity can help slow disease progression and boost quality of life. The take home message: It’s never too late to make healthier lifestyle choices. As Dr. Foody encourages readers, always talk with your doctor about steps you can take to work your way to a heart of gold.

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